Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO  Topic is solved solved with post #8236

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Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby futuresims » Thu 23. May 2013, 21:23

Hi,

THIS POST IS THE CONTINUATION FROM THE FIRST POST
viewtopic.php?f=38&t=909

I HAVE REACHED THE MAXIMUM ALLOWED WORDS ON THE PREVIOUS POST

motion 5-1
motion-5



Build Your Own Motion Base Parts List One

Parts List One – Main Frame Mechanical Parts

This list contains the materials and components needed the build the MB3 motion base used in the guidance articles.

Materials

Type-------------------- Size (mm)------- Total length (mm)-----Used for
Aluminium Channel--- 100 x 50 x 3-----5500--------------------Main Frame
Aluminium Channel--- 50 x 50 x 3------ 4000--------------------Main Frame
Aluminium Channel--- 75x 25 x 3-------2500--------------------Column & Top
Aluminium Channel--- 50 x 25 x 3------ 1600--------------------Top Frame
Aluminium Channel--- 25 x 22 x 3------ 1300--------------------Top Frame
Aluminium Flat Bar--- 25 x 12---- -------500---------------------Motor Arms
Aluminium Eq Angle-- 25 x 25 x 3------ 600--------------------- Arm Attachments

Plus some small section aluminum for mounting sensors, switches and enclosures etc.

Mechanical Components

Item---------------------------Quantity req’d
Push Rod Ball Joints M10--------6
Gas Spring Struts 550mm-------2
Linear Bearing Shaft 20mm----940mm
Linear Bearing 20mm-----------4
Pillow Block 20mm---------------4
Linear Bearing Shaft 12mm----130mm
Pillow Block 12mm---------------2
M10 Studding (Push Rods)------~1000mm
Shaft Collars 12mm bore-------2
Shaft Keys 5mm-----------------3
Column Main Spring------------see separate document
Column Main Damper----------see separate document
Column Universal Joint--------see separate document

Fixings

Item-------------------- Quantity req’d-----Used For
M10x25 Set Screws--------8 ----------------Universal Joint
M10 Nyloc nuts-------------8----------------Universal Joint
M8x16 Set Screws---------~100------------Main Frame/Column
M8 Nyloc nuts--------------~100------------Main Frame/Column
M6x20 Set Screws---------12---------------Motors
M6x16 Set Screws---------~20-------------Top & Lin Bearings
M6 Nyloc nuts--------------~30-------------Motors/Top Frame
M5x12 Set Screws---------4----------------12mm Pillow Blocks
M5x30 set Screws---------3----------------Motor Arms
M5 Nyloc nuts--------------3----------------Motor Arms

Notes: -

1. If you use a separate spring and damper arrangement, you may need four 12mm pillow blocks and a total of 220mm of 12mm linear bearing shaft.
2. Many items are sold in purchase units greater than needed e.g. nuts and set screws. In the case of fixings, the spares will be useful elsewhere in the project.

3. See the suppliers page for other potential suppliers of these items.

motion 5-1
motion 5-1


motion 5-2
motion 5-2


motion 5-3
motion 5-3


Linear bearings
Linear bearings


Build Your Own Motion Base Parts List Two

Parts List Two – Electrical, Electronic and Control Parts


Control Chain

Component------------------------- Qty-- Suggested Part------------------Suggested Supplier
Motion Software------------------- 1-----X-Sim-----------------------------X-Sim
USB modules----------------------- 2-----Included in above
Digital/Analogue Converters----- 3-----Your Choice-----------------------Your Choice
Input/Output Control Board------ 1-----Intermediate Control Board ----Your Choice
USB Hub---------------------------- 1-----Powered USB Hub----------------Any good PC shop
USB cables--------------------------2-----USB A to B Cables----------------Any good PC shop
Motor Control Boards--------------3-----Vortex VX-40-24-----------------4QD (http://www.4qd.co.uk)
----------------------------------------------24v 55A peak

Power Chain

Component------------ Qty------------Suggested Part---------Suggested Supplier

Power Supply Unit------1--------------Siemens SITOP 24v----see Siemens website for
------------------------------------------960W single phase-----local distributor or
------------------------------------------6EP-1337-3BA00

Electric Motors---------Build Your Own Motion Base Parts List Two

Parts List Two – Electrical, Electronic and Control Parts


Control Chain
Component------------------------ Qty Suggested Part Suggested Supplier
Motion Software------------------ 1 X-Sim X-Sim
USB modules--------------------- 2 Included in above
Digital/Analogue Converters- 3 Your Choice Your Choice
Input/Output Control Board- 1 Intermediate Control Board Your Choice
USB Hub-------------------------- 1 Powered USB Hub Any good PC shop
USB cables----------------------- 2 USB A to B Cables Any good PC shop
Motor Control Boards----------- 3 Vortex VX-40-24 4QD (http://www.4qd.co.uk)
----------------------------------------------24v 55A peak

Power Chain

Component------------Qty----------Suggested Part------------Suggested Supplier

Power Supply Unit-----1------------Siemens SITOP 24v-------see Siemens website for
---------------------------------------960W single phase--------local distributor or
---------------------------------------6EP-1337-3BA00

Electric Motors-------- 3----------- Parvalux PM60LWS-------see Parvalux website for
-------------------------------------- 24v 280W continuous----local distributor
--------------------------------------11.4 final rpm 100Nm----www.parvalux.co.uk

EMC Filter--------------3-----------Parvalux EMC Filter------Parvalux

Sensor System

Component------------ Qty---------Suggested Part-----------Suggested Supplier
Roll & Pitch sensors----8---------- Mercury Tilt switch-------Your Choice
Heave Sensors-------- ~6----------Magnetic Reed switch ---Your Choice
--------------------------1-----------Magnet--------------------Your Choice

Safety System

Component------------Qty---Suggested Part---------Suggested Supplier

Ignition Switch-------- 1-------Key switch------------------Your Choice
Emergency Stop-------1-------Locking Estop switch------Your Choice

End stop switch ----->6------Microswitches---------------Your Choice
Start switch-----------1------Spring return switch--------Your Choice

Start Relay ------------1------24v 150A relay --------------4QD RLY-PRO-24
Ignition LED-----------1----- 24v 12mm Red LED----------Your Choice

Cables, Connectors and Sundries

Item---------------------------Qty----------------Used For
Cable 6way------ ------------~10m---------------MCB to ICB &
----------------------------------------------------ICB to sensors
Power Cable 45A-–black-----~5m---------------PSU to MCB
Power Cable 45A–-red-------~5m---------------PSU to MCB
Mains power cable & plug---~5m--------------as req’d--Mains to PSU
DIN Rail------------------------0.5m-------------PSU mount
Box for MCB---------------------3----------------Housing MCB
Box for DAC/ICB----------------2----------------Housing ICB/DACs
Box for RP sensors--------------1---------------Roll/Pitch sensors
Box for Ignition Switch---------1---------------Ignition/Start & LED
Spade cnctor 6.3mm male----~6---------------Heave sensors
Spade cnctor 6.3mm female--~20-------------End Stop/Heave srs
Ring cnctor 8.0mm-------------3---------------4QD RNG-608--EMC Filter earth
Spade cnctor 9.5mm female--12--------------4QQD FCR-904--MCB Power
Link Wire – orange-----------~10m------------Safety circuit
Link Wire – blue -------------~1.5m------------ICB to DACs
Commoning Block 5way-------5-----------------PSU output/Sensors
PCB Mounts – USB mods-------8----------------USB modules
PCB Mounts – ICB/DAC--------8----------------ICB & DACs
PCB Spacers – DAC-------------4----------------DACs
Cable clips ----------------------1 bag-----------all cables


Notes:-

1. 4QD sell a range of accessories that, although sold in small quantities, may work out cheaper than the bulk quantities that RS require for some items – examples are the power cable, and spade connectors.

2. Heave sensors could be directly soldered, or connected to 6 way cable using standard terminal blocks which eliminates the need to male spade connectors

3. In addition to the above, soldering equipment, including shrink sleeve will be needed.

4. Similar components may be available from other suppliers.

motion 5-4
motion 5-4


motion 5-7
motion 5-7




Build Your Own Motion Base5


Final Electronics Fitting

At this point, you will have completed nearly all of the mechanical work on your motion base and some of the electronic/electrical work too. This chapter will take you through to completion of both parts of the work to the point where you are ready to configure the software settings, prior to enjoying the platform you have built.


Power Supply Unit

Power Supply Unit
Power Supply Unit


Please read the manufacturer’s instructions carefully before proceeding with installation. Make sure that you are complying with all safety and operational guidance given by the manufacturer.

The first item to fit onto the frame is the Power Supply Unit (PSU). The best location for this is immediately aft of the centre column, on the main cross member. Then there will be no danger of it being hit by the top frame when at its lowest position. Take the DIN Rail and cut a 400mm length. Make two angle brackets out of spare pieces of angle or channel and mount the rail onto the rear most edge of the cross member using 6mm nuts and bolts. Then clip the PSU onto the rail at the left end and two 5-way commoning blocks at the right end of the DIN rail.

You will notice that the ventilation slots of the PSU are facing upwards. This is so that the internal cooling of the unit can work best. You need to make sure that you cover these slots whenever there is a risk of small metal fragments (swarf) dropping onto the unit. These slots should never be covered when the unit is operating.

Cut suitable lengths of red and black 45A cable to connect one commoning block to the positive output from the PSU and one to the negative output. Finally, cut a suitable length of 3-core mains cable to connect the PSU to your mains supply. This should be capable of around 13A capacity. Connect the mains cable and plug in the PSU. Switch it on and, using a Digital VoltMeter (DVM) check that the output voltage at the commoning blocks is 24V.

After checking the output, switch off the PSU and disconnect from the mains supply before proceeding further.


EMC Units

Next mount and connect the EMC units. They are supplied with an 8mm mounting bolt and nut, so you just need to find a good location for them. Perhaps the best place is to mount them immediately under the motors themselves, to the main frame cross members.

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and connect up the output wires from the EMC units to the motors. The positive and negative wires should go to the motor input terminals and the yellow/green earth wire should be connected to the earthing terminal on the case of the motor.

Crimp a suitable (6.3mm for the VX40) spade connector to each of the red and black input wires, for later connection to the motor control boards, and a ring connector to the input yellow/green earth wire. Find a suitable location on the main frame and attach the input earth wire to the main frame using a 5mm bolt.


Motor Control Boards

Motor Control Boards 1
Motor Control Boards 1


Motor Control Boards 2
Motor Control Boards


Before proceeding, please read the manufacturer’s instructions thoroughly and familiarise yourself with the various components and connections on the MCB. Please note especially the section on handling, noting the method for making sure that the capacitors are fully discharged before handling the boards.

The next items to mount are the Motor Control Boards (MCBs). Before mounting the MCBs, you need to carry out some adjustments ( the following instructions assume you are using VX40 MCBs) – see manufacturer’s instructions for details on how to do each operation: -

- Disable half-speed reversing

- Disable regenerative braking (because we are not using batteries)

- Disable dual ramp reversing (because regenerative braking is disabled)

There are two brass mounting screws on each MCB, located on top of the heatsink block (see maker’s instructions). The best way to mount the MCBs into their boxes is to attach the heat sink to the lid of the cast aluminium box, and fix the base of the box to the main frame. So, measure and drill the holes for the heatsink first, and then fix the MCB to the box lid. Next locate the box base on the main frame. Keep in mind that: -

- the leads from the EMC units must easily reach the output spade terminals from the MCB

- the leads from the PSU must reach the input spade terminals of the MCB

- the six way cable from the ICB must reach the 6-way header plug on the MCB

Before fixing the boxes to the main frame, check which way round the MCB will go for the easiest connection of wires. Then drill holes in the box suitable for allowing the input power, output power and 6-way control cable in and out of the box. Finally bolt the box to the chosen place on the frame using 5mm bolts. Cover the bolt heads (inside the box) with insulating tape to avoid any contact between the MCB circuits and the box.

Cut suitable lengths of 45A red and black cable, with a 10mm spade at one end of each. Make sure that you don’t cut these too short as you will need to manoeuvre the MCBs whilst connected. Connect the input power terminals of each MCB to the commoning blocks next to the PSU. Connect the input wires from the EMC units to the output terminals of the MCBs.

Check the manufacturer’s drawings and instructions carefully to make sure that you connect the cables correctly for input/output and polarity.

Place the MCBs into their boxes, but do not fix the lids down yet.


USB Boxes

Next, locate a suitable place for the two boxes containing the USB modules, DACs and ICB. As you will see on figure E7, a good place is forward of the central column on the port side. You may wish to choose another location, depending on the arrangement of your PC, cockpit etc.

Having chosen the best location for your platform, fix the boxes to the main frame. Cut suitable lengths of 6-way cable to connect the ICB to each MCB. Again, do not cut the lengths of cable too short, as you will need to be able to manoeuvre the MCBs whilst still connected. Crimp the 6-way connector supplied with the MCB onto one end and strip the

wires at the other, preparatory to ICB connection. Check the MCB manufacturer’s drawings and instructions carefully to make sure that you place the wires into the 6-way connector correctly. Place the connector into the socket on the top surface of the MCB, making sure that you insert it the right way round. Put the MCBs back into their boxes, keeping the lids loose, but ensuring that the boards are not touching the box sides inadvertently.

If you have not already done so, make all the connections between the DACs and the ICB, as per the diagrams in chapter 5.

Finally, connect the ignition keyswitch across the requisite terminals on the ICB as a temporary connection (see wiring diagrams in previous chapters). Keep the keyswitch in the Off position.

Motion Platform – Top View showing placement of electronic components
Motion Platform – Top View showing placement of electronic components


Testing the Motors

With the motors now connected, there are three tests that you need to make: -

- check the rotation direction for forward motion

- check that reversing occurs properly on command

- set up the Gain and Acceleration ramps on the MCBs

Check all the connections you have made are the correct ones – no reversed polarities, all plugs in the right way round, all wires going from and to the right connections. This is important, as it is easy to make a mistake and a simple error can become expensive, with costly components being damaged.

If you are satisfied that you have made all the connections correctly and that all connections are well made, then connect USB modules to your PC (via the hub) and switch on your PC. Start Motion Drive and you should see the Connection to Platform OK message comes up on the main page. Set the Platform Configuration up for a 3-axis platform running on DAC mode 1 (if you have not already done so). Save those settings.

Open Manual Operation and select Drive Individually.

Now connect the PSU to your mains supply and switch on. The PSU should show a green “OK” light after a second.

Using your DVM, check that the input voltage from each MCB (between the 24v and 0v terminals) is indeed 24v. Switch on the ignition keyswitch.

For each motor in turn, choose an input drive Power of 60, and a Run Time of 5000. Click on Drive Platform. Check that each motor/gearbox works when commanded to, and that the rotation direction is such that it would lift the motor arm (if it were connected). For Drives A & B, this means turning clockwise when looks at the output shaft and anti-clockwise for Drive C. If this is not so, then you will need to reverse the connections on the motors. Remember to turn off power to the PSU and wait for a few minutes until the system has discharged before swapping the wires around. That is the first of the three tests complete.

With the motors confirmed as working and also turning in the right direction for a positive (forward) command, next we need to check reverse (negative) command operation. For each motor, first carry out a forward command (Power 60 and Run Time 5000), then a negative command. Check that the reverse pin LED lights on the ICB, and that the motor turns in the reverse direction (so that the motor arm would go down).

If you get a failure with either of these tests, you should check your wiring is correct, and that the correct control and power voltages are present, using your DVM.

The third test is to set-up the MCBs for correct operation with a motion platform. Please refer to the manufacturer’s instructions when carrying out these operations. You will need to lift the MCBs out of their boxes to access the adjustment points, while they are connected and powered up. Make sure that you switch off power first, then lift the MCBs out and set them down so that you can access the components you need to, but that there is no risk of the circuits or terminals on the board being shorted by touching the frame or sides of the box.

a. Set the acceleration and deceleration ramps to minimum. (see manufacturers instructions)
b. Check the RAT and MST settings on the MCBs. These are pre-set at the factory at mid-point. Ideally, the RAT setting should be less than 10 on the power scale, and the MST should be about 2-4 points higher. You may need to adjust the presets on the board to get these settings to about this range. (You can test this by inputting a range of small power signals whilst running on Drive Individual, as the software settings for RAT and MMT are ignored in that mode)
c. Set the Gain correctly. Using a power input of 255 (maximum) adjust the gain control, as per manufacturer’s instructions.

Once all that has been done, manually drive the motors round until the keyway in the gearbox output shaft is in the correct position for attaching the motor arms (at about 12 o’clock). Switch off power. Replace the MCBs back into their boxes (after discharging the capacitors, per instructions) and fix the box lids down. You should not have to adjust the MCBs again.


Fitting the motor arms

Fitting the motor arms
Fitting the motor arms


The next step is to fit the motor arms and connect them to the top frame, via the push rods.

Figure E8 - Fitting the motor arms
Figure E8 - Fitting the motor arms


Take the motor arm and fit the 5mm clamp bolt, keeping it loose. Check the edges of the keyway on the gearbox shaft – if they are rough and proud, you may need to smooth down using emery paper or a fine toothed file. Slide the arm onto the output shaft of the gearbox (this may require some gentle taps with a small hammer). Position the arm about half way along the shaft, and slide in the rectangular shaft key (this may need some smoothing also).

Tighten the clamp bolt a little so that the arm is held on its own. Now, using a spirit level, check that the arm is vertical in the Port/Starboard direction. Adjust if necessary and when as perfectly vertical as you can get it, tighten the clamp bolt fully.

Now attach the push rods to their attachment points on the top frame. Next attach them to the motor arms (you may need to move the motor arms a little to allow this). Using your

spirit level, check that the push rods are vertical in the Port/Starboard direction. If not, then you will need to move the motor arm along the output shaft and repeat the step above.

Tighten all bolts once the arms and push rods are in the right positions. See Figure E8.


Attaching the Sensors

You have already configured the sensors and checked that they are working and seen by the Motion Drive software. So, this is just a matter of attaching them to the platform itself.

Figure E9 - Adjusting the Sensors
Figure E9 - Adjusting the Sensors


Take the box containing the Roll and Pitch sensors and attach it to the Top Frame. A good place to locate it is on the middle runner of the top frame, as far back as you can (so that it is out of the way of the microswitches). Drill suitable holes in the sensor box and in the middle runner and attach using some 5mm bolts. Bring the cables from the sensors box along the underside of the middle runner, past the centre joint and drop them down to the USB box containing the ICB. Leave

sufficient slack to allow for platform movement, but control the cables so that they do not snag on the joint, the linear bearings or the microswitches.

Fit the heave sensors to one of the main centre column supports, using the formation as suitable for your choice of 2 or 4 sensor operation. Fit the triggering magnet onto the moving part of the column (the main column sidepiece) and adjust so that the magnet triggers the reed switches as it passes. You will need to accurately measure the correct location for the

Figure E10 - Adjusting the Heave Sensors
Figure E10 - Adjusting the Heave Sensors


magnet, so that it shows Heave Centre (or the middle of the OK Zone) when the platform is at mid position in its Heave movement. (For the platform design we have been following, this will be 80mm from its present, unloaded, highest position).

Finally, open the box containing the ICB and connect the sensor wires to the correct terminals on the ICB.

You should now carry out a series of manual movements of the platform to check the calibration of
the sensors in all three axes. Adjust the angle of the tilt sensors, and the placement of the heave sensors as appropriate so that the platform is centre and level when the sensors indicate so, and that the various zones (left, left left etc.) are indicated when the platform is at the correct angle.


Fitting the Safety Circuit

Fitting the Safety Circuit
Fitting the Safety Circuit


The exact configuration of the safety circuit will depend on your particular design and where you intend to house the motion base. The former is relevant because that will dictate how many microswitches you will need, and where they will be placed on the platform. The latter is important because you want the Ignition switch, the On/Off switch and the Emergency Stop switches to be easily and quickly accessible to you.

You will recall that the safety circuit is a daisy chain of switches, all of which are normally closed and are broken when an emergency situation arises. The breaking of the circuit causes the control part of all three MCBs to be switched off, and hence the motors stop running. The motors will not be able run again until the emergency situation is corrected and the safety circuit switched on again.

The safety circuit functions to protect both people and equipment from damage and harm, so you should take great care in fitting the various elements that you want.

The microswitches function to prevent the platform going beyond its design envelope of movement. They need to be placed so that they break the circuit at the point where the platform reaches the design movement limit – in our case +/-20 degrees in Roll and Pitch and +/-80mm in Heave. So, you should fabricate brackets and striker plates so that the switches are broken at those extremes of movement.

You may also wish to protect the drive motors from damage, or from the motor arms going past the vertical (either top or bottom). Again, you will need to fabricate some brackets and striker plates so that the motor arms hit the microswitches just before they reach vertical.

The people protection comes in two parts. First is the bank of switches accessible from out side the platform. These are the Ignition Switch, On/Off switch, “Platform Live” LED and possibly an Emergency Stop switch. They should be mounted in an equipment box, which is located on the platform so that someone standing outside the platform or cockpit can quickly operate them without incurring risk to themselves in doing so. (So it is no good if the person has to get down under the platform load to reach the switches).

The second part of people protection may come from inside the cockpit that you are mounting on your platform. If you intend to have a cockpit mounted onto the platform, it is a good idea to locate an Emergency Stop button inside the cockpit so that if things go wrong, or if the occupants feel uncomfortable, they can immediately stop all motion. Having a button inside

your cockpit will require that you have some means of connecting and disconnecting it when you move the cockpit on and off the platform.

Carry out physical checks to ensure that the switches are triggered at the correct angle of Roll and Pitch and amount of Heave movement. Adjust as necessary.

Once the safety circuit has been installed, you should close the two boxes containing the USB modules, DACs and ICB and fix down the lids. Before moving on to testing and configuring the platform, take some time to tidy up the wires and cables running round the platform. Use wire ties and the self-adhesive clips to make the runs tidy, secure and free from being snagged or damaged.

Your platform is now complete and ready to be tuned to your requirements using the various settings available in Motion Drive. Follow the instructions provided with Motion Drive on how to configure the software to your liking.

parvalux
T +44 (0) 121 333 5964
F +44 (0) 121 333 5966
E service@parvalux.com
W www.parvalux.com

Prices for parvalux 24 Volt DC Motors may 2013

PM60LWS 24v DC 280W continuous 11.4 final rpm 100Nm YZ shaft with EMC filter

price guide: Qty : 1-4 = £504.08

price guide: Qty : 5-14 = £38720

Del est :5weeks

Carriage & vat charges will apply

Payment : pro-forma : bank transfer

Motor Assembly 1
Motor Assembly 1


Motor Assembly 2
Motor Assembly 2


Motors can be ordered with double shafts
Motors can be ordered with double shafts


Reference by another user using the same motors
24 Volt DC Servo Motor


Reference by another user using the same motors
24 Volt DC Servo Motor with pots on Double Shafted Motor running 6DOF Platform



3 DOF 24V DC Motion Platform
3 DOF 24V DC Motion Platform


MORE IS COMING
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby tronicgr » Fri 24. May 2013, 14:33

Hi,

Very nice project! Lots of details! Good job!


However, you forgot to mention that Nicolas moved to new hydraulic motion system donated by Bosch Rexroth to be able to handle the load of a true size Cessna Cockpit:





...and use Elise-NG software for the 6DOF math... I know Nicolas, he is friend of John (planmix) from back from 2008...



Thanos
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby futuresims » Fri 24. May 2013, 17:16

Hi Thanos,
I found the two videos purely by accident.
I have only used them as a reference because they are using the same motors in the same project that I have posted.

All members and non members please participate by adding new and more modern designs and wiring schematic diagrams.

Thank for participating Thanos.


I am calling out to all X-Sim members or New Visitors to the X-Sim website to help produce a 3D SOLIWORKS Cad Drawing of this 3DOF 24V Dc Motion Base for the X-SIm Community.

Please PM SIr No Name

Thank you
Last edited by futuresims on Sat 25. May 2013, 13:27, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO  Topic is solved

Postby futuresims » Sat 25. May 2013, 01:11

Hi Thanos,
Can you please make a nice wiring diagram using your new AMC128USB for this system.

There are other members and non members who have limited knowledge of electronics and software.

I have provided a really nice and neat system that anyone can build including a cutting list.

This is a good opportunity for you to show the X-Sim Community how they can wire up this system using your new AMC128USB electronic board.

Could you show it using pots.

Thanks Thanos.
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby tanito87 » Tue 4. Jun 2013, 22:54

Well, what can i say. Just WOW men. Thank you for all that info. I was very scared to start my own project but after your 2 part post i decided to create an account and build my own 3dof.
But i want to ask you some questions if it's not too much bother:
Is this suitable for racing sim?
Can the Spring and bumper be removed? I don't know if it's suitable considering i want to use AC motors, and for racing sim.
Can it be driven by AC motors?
DC engines are way too expensive here in Argentina, and it's cheaper to buy an Ac engine with an inverter. (Yeah, THAT expensive)


Thank you very much

PS: Btw i have pm sirnoname to help you with solidworks modeling.
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby sirnoname » Tue 4. Jun 2013, 23:49

For the electric part: you can use DC and AC motors. Both is supported here and well tested.
DC are wiper motors from the junk yard OR the expensive ones ;)
However, collect infos what you get locally, there are enough interfaces possible and more are coming soon.
Unknown interfaces can be added and programmed by me or tronicgr or another member that is interested.
If a answer is correct or did help you for a solution, please use the solve button.
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby futuresims » Wed 5. Jun 2013, 00:07

Hi tanito87
tanito87 wrote:Can the Spring and bumper be removed? I don't know if it's suitable considering i want to use AC motors, and for racing sim.
Can it be driven by AC motors?


The Spring and bumper can be removed if you what needs to be changed.
For example perhaps the motors may require more horsepower to compensate for the spring.

I am not an expert with this.
If there is a member who knows the answer to this and it is a good answer I can add it to my two part tutorial so many more people can easily follow it.
If another member wants to contribute to the growth of my two part tutorial I will add the information to it followed by their name.

I posted this two part tutorial to inspire other members to participate with it and to help this tutorial grow.

Yes you can use AC Motors and many members recommend AC Motors because of their Horsepower and speed.

Have you seen the Sew Motors and tronics AMC128USB Board?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fftL82DyQSM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nHeigsB7uU

Thank you
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby tanito87 » Wed 5. Jun 2013, 01:25

I have plenty of Sew Movitrack B at work! At least 20. So i can test them, and i did saw this video but i don't know where can i get the AMC1280USB. I haven't found any information related to where to buy it or the pcb diagrams.

And i will use 1hp engines so i think the spring supression can be done.
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby futuresims » Wed 5. Jun 2013, 18:20

Hi tanito87,

You purchase the boards from Thanos.
His name here in the forum is, tronicgr
He joined the forum when it was first launched and he has been one of the main inspiring forces in the movement of the Build your own motion simulator.
He has made some incredible electronics contribution's to this community and continues to do so.
http://motionsim.blogspot.ca/

Thank you tanito87.
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futuresims
 
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Re: Building Your Own 3DOF 24V DC Motion Base PART TWO

Postby Turn » Wed 5. Jun 2013, 18:45

I like how this guy takes charge! Good job, futuresims :)

futuresims wrote:Hi Thanos,
Can you please make a nice wiring diagram using your new AMC128USB for this system.

There are other members and non members who have limited knowledge of electronics and software.

I have provided a really nice and neat system that anyone can build including a cutting list.

This is a good opportunity for you to show the X-Sim Community how they can wire up this system using your new AMC128USB electronic board.

Could you show it using pots.

Thanks Thanos.
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